Mark Perri

Mark Perri for Delaware’s U.S. Representative

The Issues: C. O. R. N.

Climate Crisis, Overpopulation, Racism, Nuclear war

The Answers:

Climate Crisis:
The Green New Deal: a transition to 100% wind, water and solar energy by 2030.

Creation of living wage jobs for every American who needs work, by transitioning to 100% renewable energy and investing in housing, public transit, sustainable agriculture, and conservation. Health care, education, and racial justice as human rights.

Subsidies need to be redirected from Big Industrial Ag to support small farmers and to support community farms and the institutions that can provide real food in a way that is sustainable for the long haul. That means localized food systems rather than this globalized industrial factory system which is extremely unhealthy for the economy, farmers and for people who eat the food.

Put people to work on urgent issues worthy of them. Cancel all student debt. Wall Street bailout was $17T; student loan bailout would be under $2T and yield a much higher return on investment.

Overpopulation:
Universal single-payer healthcare. Healthcare is a right, including women’s reproductive rights. will tame medical inflation and save $500B per year by bulk prescription purchasing & slashing administrative bureaucracy. Encourage immigration, but we Americans must all learn to consume less (by a factor of 2 or even 10) resources and energy. We need to build our communities for the transition to fossil-fuel free living and thriving.

Racism:
Reparations, but beyond that, education. End police militarization, start real community policing. Student-teacher ratios in schools should be 12:1. Invest real money in our public schools, in particular urban schools. Creation of living wage jobs for every American who needs work, by transitioning to 100% renewable energy and investing in housing, public transit, sustainable agriculture, and conservation. Health care, education, and racial justice as human rights.

Guarantee easy access to voting in low-income communities.

The Green New Deal will repeal the PATRIOT Act and those parts of the National Defense Authorization Act that violate our civil liberties. It will prohibit the Department of Homeland Security and the FBI from conspiring with local police forces to suppress our freedoms of assembly and of speech.

Please watch the Green Party’s VP Candidate, Ajamu Baraka, visiting Baltimore: screenshot-from-2016-10-31-12-11-17

and be sure to read Robert Bohm’s article, From American Revolution to today’s police killings.

Nuclear war:
Eliminating fossil fuel energy will take a lot of the pressure for war away. Nuclear weapons must be eliminated. Forge international agreements that would lead to the retirement of these capabilities. The development of nuclear weapons for new battlefield purposes is particularly dangerous. Instead spend this money to build a renewable energy infrastructure for America with the goal of making wars for oil obsolete and eliminating the need for nuclear power.

Rethinking of the War on Terror:

We are calling for a new kind of offensive, a peace offensive in the Middle East. The peace offensive would include an embargo on weapons sales and a freeze on funding to states that support terrorist enterprises — Saudi Arabia in particular. Massive cuts in military spending, including the closure of many bases, a shutdown of the F-35 program and not moving forward with the modernization of the US nuclear weapons program.

My part starts at 01:52. Thanks to WMDT channel 47!!

Start at 20:46…
screenshot-from-2016-11-05-201112

Mark Perri

Summer ice in the Arctic may be gone by 2020. Climate change is already killing 400,000 people a year, and costing us 1.2 trillion dollars a year. We know our climate is broken.

Our economy is based on burning fossil fuels. The problem is, that’s killing the planet. Climate change is the most urgent and important issue confronting us. We need to stop burning fossil fuels. We need to change our economy.

Economic change driven by climate change is happening whether we manage it or not. But our government is not limiting carbon with any urgency. We’re drilling for oil in the Arctic, and cooking oil from sand in Canada—shipping it to Delaware City for refining. Our government is accelerating the catastrophe. This shows a terrifying willingness to sacrifice our children for short-term gain. And to shut our eyes to the danger. But, solutions to the climate crisis will also fix our economy; putting people to important work, strengthening the public sphere, and reining in corporations. Real, Green solutions give power to the community; through transit systems accountable to their users, local organic agriculture, and local renewable energy. We need a New Deal. We need a GREEN New Deal.

I am very active in the local and national sustainability movement with Wilmington In Transition promoting and developing the managed transition to post-fossil-fuel community. I was a Green Party Delaware gubernatorial candidate in 2012 to inject meaningful discussion of climate change into the political debate. As a long-time member of the Green Party in Delaware on the Coordinating Committee I have been promoting and expanding the party, increasing GPDE registration and developing Green candidates. I work in the Wilmington community’s Creating a Community of Peace movement with the Wilmington Peacekeepers, Delaware Pacem In Terris, and Delaware Interfaith Power & Light; I am the creator, developer and maintainer of a local peace resources database, peaceherenow.org. I am a math, science, ELA GED tutor with Wilmington’s West End Neighborhood House, and a clerk at Delaware Local Food Exchange, a small grocery store that is developing the economic sustainability of our local food supply chain.

As your representative in Congress I will work to create a sustainable human community on Earth by helping to implement Jill Stein’s plan. Please check out Dr. Stein’s thoughtful responses to the questions in last Sunday’s “ugliest debate in American history.” Now more than ever we need the high level of thinking, wisdom, and compassion Jill Stein presents:

Let me, you know, just say, there are critical issues before us. The American people have really had it economically. This recovery has been a recovery at the top, despite some minor—minor suggestions that income is rising. Indeed, this is only a small amount among lower- and middle-income families, probably due to the living-wage battles that have been led by the working people of America. An entire generation is locked in debt. Black lives are struggling for safety, walking down the street or driving down the street. Millions of immigrants are living in fear of deportation. Donald Trump has shown that the Republicans are the party of hate and fearmongering, but the Democrats are the party of deportation, detentions and night raids.

We have wars for oil that are massively expanding, have no end. The Obama administration is now bombing seven countries. This is bankrupting our budget. Half of our discretionary budget is being spent on these wars, which are not making us more safe, but rather less safe. Almost half of your income taxes are going to this massive Defense Department, which is not really not a Defense Department, it is an offense department.

And the climate is in meltdown. We are seeing superstorms now in the Caribbean, a thousand people tragically killed in the country of Haiti, illustrating again how it is people of color and people in undeveloped nations and poor people who are really on the front lines of climate change; extended drought, continuing fires in the—in the West of the country. We have a climate crisis here.

And these two are bickering about who is more abusive and who has been more derelict in their responsibilities towards the American people. And I—personally, I think they’re both right…

In this election, we are not only deciding what kind of a world we will have, but whether we will have a world or not going forward. We are facing catastrophic climate change. I’m the only candidate that is talking about that and the transformative solutions that we need. We call, quite simply, for an emergency jobs program that will solve the emergency of climate change, creating 20 million good-wage jobs to transform our economy to 100 percent clean, renewable energy, a healthy and sustainable food system, and public transportation which is efficiently and renewably powered, and restoring our ecosystems. This will revive the economy, turn the tide on climate change, make the wars for oil obsolete, and it pays for itself simply in terms of the incredible benefits to our health from phasing out fossil fuels. There are—I should mention, we call for phasing out these fossil fuels completely by 2030, so a truly emergency program. And we call for an immediate ban on all new fossil fuel infrastructure. This includes in the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation, where this battle is going on that is being so courageously led by our indigenous brothers and sisters who are setting an example for us all of how we must stand together and stand strong for our water supply, for our human rights, for our democracy and for the one Mother Earth that we share, who is incredibly imperiled, as we speak.

Please read Gregg Zoroya’s recent USA Today article: Tough Love is Needed on Climate Change

The Interfaith Power & Light’s Reflection Guide for Voters is in agreement with my and the Green Party’s values.

People care deeply about global warming, but their concern does not translate into any forward motion. As they think about the problem, they seem to run into brick walls, characterized by lack of clear knowledge, seemingly irreversible causes, and a problem with no real solution. As a result they are frustrated and eager for a solution but unsure of which way to go. The symptoms of this frustration are clear. The first is that people literally don’t like to think or talk about the subject. They always seem to want to move the topic from global warming itself to more familiar topics, such as moral deterioration, where at least they feel on firmer ground.

The notion that people already want to “do the right thing” is an extremely hopeful piece of information which can and should be used as the centerpiece of developing successful policy.

In order to counter the fact that people don’t like to feel powerless, we must not only design policies in which citizens appear more powerful, but we also need to provide a playing field upon which their actions actually do matter.

  • Address tendencies for denial head on.
  • Create a set of realistic opportunities for participating in positive actions.
  • Convey a message that it is not too late, that action can be taken that will make a difference. Making a difference can be highlighted BOTH in immediate economic terms (which are important as they appear more tangible) and climate impacts.
  • Create an atmosphere for people to experience both positive emotions and a positive view of the self. This must include real opportunities for change.
— Kari Marie Norgaard

Green Party candidate for DE’s US House seat speaks with WDEL

By Lauren Huet 10:20pm, October 12, 2016

We’ve systemically neglected our cities and especially the black community for what, centuries? We have under invested in our community and this [gun violence] is just the natural, kind of to be expected, result. The purpose of the system is what it does and this one is producing gun violence and epidemic violence. We have to work fundamentally at the root cause here.

 

 


This is from my gubernatorial campaign in 2012. It still applies…except of course our inaction and denial of climate change has made the situation even more urgent: I’d tweek some of what I said below up a notch or six, accordingly.  Thanks Nancy Willing for preserving it!

 

Oct 17, 2012
Green Party Of Delaware Writes: What The Media Isn’t Saying About Gubernatorial Candidate Mark Perri’s Debate

From Facebook ~

The News Journal must not have been at this debate. Else it’s actively suppressing Perri’s main message. Here’s part of what he said, in his opening and closing statements. Mark Perri: “We’re just shifting deck chairs here. And, not to be too modest about it, my courage is proven by all the active ignoring of most of what I was talking about. In addition to “Shut down the refinery, now,” Below are the statements ignored by the corporate media in yesterday’s Delaware gubernatorial debates. (As posted on  facebook – originally posted to Delaware Liberal)

INTRO

Summer ice in the Arctic may be gone by 2020. Climate change is already killing 400,000 people a year, and costing us 1.2 trillion dollars a year.
We know our climate is broken.

Our economy is based on burning fossil fuels. The problem is, that’s killing the planet.

Climate change is the most urgent and important issue confronting us.

We need to stop burning fossil fuels. We need to change our economy.

Economic change driven by climate change is happening whether we manage it or not. But our government is not limiting carbon with any urgency. We’re drilling for oil in the Arctic, and cooking oil from sand in Canada—shipping it to Delaware City for refining.

Our government is accelerating the catastrophe.

This shows a terrifying willingness to sacrifice our children for short-term gain. And to shut our eyes to the danger.

But, solutions to the climate crisis will also fix our economy;

putting people to important work, strengthening the public sphere, and reining in corporations.

Real, Green solutions give power to the community; through transit systems accountable to their users, local organic agriculture, and local renewable energy.

We need a New Deal.

We need a GREEN New Deal.

OUTRO

Don’t wait for the corporatocracy for clean-tech jobs—they’re busy making money for themselves where labor’s cheaper overseas.

No matter who wins the elections in November, the price of oil will still be mostly set by other countries.

If we really want to protect ourselves from high gas prices, we have only one effective policy: extreme energy efficiency.

The Republicans are in the pockets of the dying fossil fuel industry and the Democrats are afraid of them.

So we can’t expect their leadership.

This is something only one political party is really facing—the Green Party…

Every crisis presents opportunity.

The opportunity cost of not changing to a sustainable economy is immense.

Our government, sponsored by the dinosaur fossil fuels industry, is standing in the way of work we need to do.

John F. Kennedy said, We are not afraid to entrust the American people with unpleasant facts…a nation that is afraid to let its people judge the truth…is a nation that is afraid of its people.

So who’s afraid?

Think for yourself. Vote your conscience.

You have the power.

GreenParty Delaware WHYY-TV will air Tuesday’s debate on Wednesday at 5 p.m. and again at 11 p.m.

News Journal and Newsworks Gubernatorial debate coverage.

Plus, Mark Perri, GPDE candidate for governor, responded to a  Harrington resident’s questionnaire. As follows. On 10/12/2012 11:48 AM, Chad Snader wrote: “I just sent the following email to ALL of the candidates running for legislative offices here in Delaware. I am looking forward to seeing who does or does not respond.”


Good morning. As a voter that is attempting to make informed decisions for the upcoming elect

ions I have done quite a bit of research on all of you to determine what your positions are for most of the standard issues like the economy, taxes, schools, etc. The following are questions that I have not been able to find answers for to this point. I would greatly appreciate you or someone from your staff providing me with your take on the following questions. In the interest of fairness, please know that I will be sharing these questions and responses (or the lack of responses) to all my friends and family via social media and word of mouth. I realize that at first glance, some of these issues may seem irrelevant or inconsequential, however; the sustainable food movement and the ability to choose our food is becoming a larger and larger movement and should be taken seriously. Thank you in advance for your time and consideration.

1. Californians this year will be voting on Proposition 37, a referendum to determine whether or not food products with genetically modified organisms (GMO) should be labeled as containing GMOs. If a bill was introduced here in Delaware that would require GMO containing products to be labeled, would you support it and/or vote for it?

A. GMOs will be created and used but they must be produced and consumed safely. GMO foods should be produced under well-designed and carefully followed quality plans with testing appropriate to the level of risk. The costs of GMOs must not be externalized; the testing costs and environmental costs, for example, should be reflected in their prices. People who buy GMO food should know what they are buying and what the risks are.

2. Currently in Delaware, the sale of raw, unpasteurized milk is illegal. Delaware adopted the federally recommended Pasteurized Milk Ordanance (PMO), without legislative approval, to ban the sale of raw milk. In this day of decreasing numbers of dairy farms in the state, not to mention the demise of small family farms in general, I would like your opinion, for or against the sale of raw milk. Bear in mind that Pennsylvania allows it and New Jersey recently voted to approve on farm sales because people were driving across state lines to purchase the food they prefer and the state was losing out on a revenue stream, no matter how small it was in the grand scheme of things.


A. People will drink raw milk and sell it but it must be produced safely. All foods should be produced under well-designed and carefully followed HACCP plans (or their equivalent) with pathogen testing at intervals commensurate with the level of risk. People who buy raw milk should know what the risks are.


3. In general, do you feel people have the right to choose what they eat and drink or do you feel that the state or federal government should determine how people feed themselves?

A. People have free will. Government is nothing more or less than the system we use to live together successfully. Tools, systems, and their use must be constantly improved. Call it The Big Conversation. People do and will continue to choose what they ingest, mostly to their detriment and whether it’s legal or not, but more and more, education, information, knowledge are helping us to eat better. Government should promote this.

4. Currently, Delaware grows large amounts of genetically modified corn and soy that requires massive amounts of chemical fertilizer and pesticides. Would you be supportive of a farm bill that would redirect crop subsidies from large industrial farms that, in many cases do not need the subsidies, to smaller scale farms that would like to break the GMO crop cycle but cannot afford to leave their fields in cover crops for two or three years to heal the soil and begin farming in a more sustainable fashion?

A. Yes. Your points are well stated.

5. The small farm/cottage food industry in Delaware is almost non-existent. I recently was in a local store and they sold jams and the like from local producers, however, none of them were from Delaware. All the products were from Pennsylvania. Having looked into what it would take to sell homemade products like pickles and jellies made from our own garden recently, I found that it is virtually impossible here in Delaware to produce these products due to the immense costs and red tape, put in place by the Delaware Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Public Health. This is a two part question. First, would you support streamlining this process to provide an avenue for the few small family farms that we have left to provide processed foods they can produce from their homegrown fruits, vegetables and animals? If so, can you elaborate and if not can you please tell me why?

A. Yes, see my remark about The Big Conversation and continual improvement above; processes are dynamic, the regulations used to manage them must be consistent with that. Climate change is driving localization, regulations need to facilitate that adaptation.


~*~

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View comments

  1. Thanks, Nancy. For completeness (actually for self-promotion) here’s my response to the Delaware League of Women Voters questionnaire.

    GPDE’s candidate for governor just filled out the LWV questionnaire:

    Q: Identify 3 issues you think are a top priority. Please discuss 1 or more of them.
    A: Climate change, with its extreme weather conditions, is exacting a heavy economic toll on countries, including the United States, through destruction by droughts, floods, wildfires and loss of crops. The steady depletion of natural resources, especially fossil fuels, with accelerating climate change, are combining with crippling levels of personal and national debt to thrust us into a global depression that will dwarf any in the history of capitalism. We are not prepared.

    Q: The education system of the United States overall has lost global pre-eminence. What would you do to improve Delaware’s public education system? Do you believe our current system of funding is adequate and fair to all districts? If not, what would you change? Please be specific.
    A: I believe in education, not indoctrination. Schools should stop turning our children into servile students, employees, consumers or citizens. It is very important to teach our children how to ask good questions. Corporate funding, high-stakes standardized testing and a decade of No Child Left Behind: a vast, well-endowed and lucrative sector that seeks to dismantle, privatize, and militarize public education and destroy teachers’ unions.

    Q: The Affordable Care Act allows for states to expand Medicaid health coverage to include more people. Do you support or oppose this expansion? Please discuss your reasons.
    A: Provide complete, affordable, quality health care for every American through an improved Medicare-for-all insurance program. Allow full access to all medically justified contraceptive and reproductive care. Roll back the community drivers of chronic disease, including poor nutrition, health-damaging pollution, and passive dirty transportation. Invest in essential community health infrastructure like local, organic food systems, bikes, public transit, renewable energy, phase out toxic chemicals.

    Q: How important do you think it is to plan for sea level rise in Delaware? What steps, if any, should government take in such planning?
    A: The quality of our lives will depend on the quality of our communities. If communal structures are strong we will be able to endure the challenges of climate change. Localism will soon be our fate. It will also be our strategy for survival. Learning practical skills, becoming more self-sufficient, forming bonds of trust with our neighbors will determine the quality of our lives and the lives of our children. Government’s role is to facilitate this strategy.

    Q: What is your position on hydro-fracking as a regional concern? Please explain.
    A: Fracking now produces as much carbon pollution as the entire nation of France produces in one year, burning $100 billion worth of gas for no return. While reducing CO2 emissions relative to coal when extracted properly, natural gas cannot be allowed to delay the adoption of sustainable energy. Fracking must be highly regulated to minimize its destructive aspects as we become sustainable.

    Reply

  2. But wait, there’s more! This one for the Delaware Right To Life Education Fund.

    Dear DRTL Ed Fund,

    Thank you for the opportunity to state my position with respect to the questions you sent by mail this week. I’ve transcribed your questions and included my answers, below.

    I’ll list a few principles first, which I hope will give you a clearer idea of my positions.

    1) People have free will. Each of us can choose to stand by our beliefs, or not, irrespective of the law. People cannot have their control of their lives taken from them.

    2) Abortion is a reality. It will happen. If abortion is illegal, it will happen under cruel circumstances. Abortion needs to be managed humanely, safely, and civilly. That means we need the flexibility, the choice, to address each and every situation to make it better.

    3) An embryo is not a person, stem cell research saves peoples’ lives.

    Some of us are against capital punishment but for abortion. Some of us are against abortion but for capital punishment. Most of us, whatever our stand on preserving the lives of the thoughtlessly conceived unborn, thoughtlessly participate in an economy that steals from all the unborn.

    — Wendell Berry, The Failure of War, in The Citizenship Papers, 2003

    And now, to answer your questions.

    My responses to the Delaware Right to Life’s questionnaire sent to me 2012-10-1.

    Candidate Name: Mark Perri
    Party: Green Party of Delaware
    Office Sought: Governor

    Q1. Do you believe the law should prohibit abortion (i.e., the intentional killing of an unborn child) at all stages of development from fertilization onward, regardless of the circumstances of conception, and regardless the method of the abortion (i.e., surgical or chemical)?

    A1. No

    Q2. Do you oppose taxpayer funding of abortion in health care or otherwise?

    A2. No

    Q3. Do you support or oppose an amendment to Delaware state law to restore the rights of all by defining a “person” to include any human being from the moment of fertilization?

    A3. Oppose

    Q4. Will you work to deny tax funding of all public and private agencies that perform or promote abortion?

    A4. No

    Q5. Will you oppose legislation that would force individuals or organizations to provide services that directly contradict the teachings of their faith (i.e., contraception)?

    A5. No

    Q6. Will you work to prohibit human embryonic stem cell research in all its forms?

    A6. No

    Q7. Will you oppose any laws that legalize the cloning of human beings, whether for allegedly therapeutic reasons or otherwise, and instead work to prohibit all forms of human cloning.

    A7. No

    Q8. Will you oppose “right to die” and “assisted suicide” legislation.

    A8. No

    Q9. Do you support or oppose legislation using buffers to limit “education, protesting, and counseling” near abortion clinics?

    A9. Support

    Q10. Do you oppose “presumed consent” organ donation (does not require individual consent)?

    A10. No

    DRTL seems to not have gotten to publishing my responses on their Web site yet.

    http://derighttolife.org/voterguide.html

    Reply

  3. But wait, there’s more! For Delmarva Broadcasting.

    Why are you seeking this office?

    “The global need for new solutions is driving the most important economic development race of the 21st century,” David Danielson, assistant secretary for energy efficiency and renewable energy at the U.S. Energy Department, told the gathering. “We need to win it.”

    Delaware is not joining this race. We need to, now. Economic change driven by climate change is happening whether we manage it or not. But our government is not limiting carbon with any urgency. We’re drilling for oil in the Arctic, and cooking oil from sand in Canada—shipping it to Delaware City for refining. Our government is accelerating the catastrophe. This shows a terrifying willingness to sacrifice our children for short-term gain. And to shut our eyes to the danger. But, solutions to the climate crisis will also fix our economy.

    What should be done to improve the economy?

    Putting people to important work, strengthening the public sphere, and reining in corporations. Real, Green solutions give power to the community; through transit systems accountable to their users, local organic agriculture, and local renewable energy.We need a GREEN New Deal. If we really want to protect ourselves from high gas prices, we have only one effective policy: extreme energy efficiency. This is something only one political party is really facing—the Green Party. Every crisis presents opportunity. The opportunity cost of not changing to a sustainable economy is immense. We truly need to embrace – sooner, rather than later – a Green New Deal, as proposed in the Jill Stein’s (Green Party candidate for US President) platform. We CAN create jobs, re-build our infrastructure, create truly secure and sustainable energy independence, and draw down our conflict level abroad, all while pulling out all of the stops to preserve and protect our physical environment.

    Reply

  4. What should be done to improve education?

    I believe in education, not indoctrination. Schools should stop turning our children into servile students, employees, consumers or citizens. It is very important to teach our children how to ask good questions. Corporate funding, high-stakes standardized testing and a decade of No Child Left Behind: a vast, well-endowed and lucrative sector that seeks to dismantle, privatize, and militarize public education and destroy teachers’ unions. STEM is important and necessary, but not sufficient. Education should be free through 4 years of college. Student loans need to be forgiven. Delaware tradition of high quality teaching must be preserved, fostered, developed by empowering our excellent teachers. Teachers should not be laid off at the end of the school year as a result of the budgeting process. Funding should be focused on teachers and kids, at the expense of administrators. The quality/funding of education should not depend on where a child lives. Parent involvement must be increased.

    What should be done to improve public safety?

    Repair our communities rather than dump resources into the prison-industrial complex. Work to eliminate laws tying judge’s hands with mandatory sentencing requirements. Immediately implement the legalization medical use of marijuana and move to permit general legal sales under suitable regulatory framework. Decriminalize marijuana — begin to treat drug use as a public health problem, not a criminal problem. Work toward full employment by funding, promoting green jobs in sustainable energy, mass transit, sustainable organic agriculture, and clean manufacturing, as well as social work, teaching, and and other service jobs, grants and low-interest loans to green businesses and cooperatives, with an emphasis on small, locally-based companies that keep the wealth created by local labor circulating in the community, rather than being drained off to enrich absentee investors. Demilitarize the police, get them out of cars and into communities, trained for that. Continue anti-bullying educati

    What should be done to improve and/or protect the environment?

    We must create an inclusive program to train workers for the new clean-energy economy, addressing both the environment and social justice by prioritizing the creation of green jobs in communities of color and low-income communities. We need legislation to increase Delaware’s and Delawareans’ use of renewable energy to 33 percent by 2020. We need to tax the burning of fossil fuels in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from 1990 levels at least 40 percent by 2020 and 95 percent by 2050. The official policy of the state and local governments, businesses, nonprofit organizations, and individual residents should be to prepare for the effects of climate change and, by doing so, reduce its social, economic, and environmental effects. SEU bonds in low-income communities, public housing, and middle-class neighborhoods. Accelerate bringing new green industries to Delaware. Full cost accounting integral to every decision, e.g., Del City refinery, based on comparative cost of renewables.

    Reply